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Titleist launch next generation AP1 & AP2 irons
September 6, 2011

TitleistDedicated to providing serious golfers with the highest performing equipment in golf, Titleist introduces the next generation of its ground-breaking Advanced Performance irons. The new Titleist AP1 and AP2 irons (712 Series) stay true to the design mission of "Advanced Performance with Feel." Both models are multi-material, dual cavity irons that provide modern ball flight and forgiveness with the traditional looks, feel and sound that serious golfers have come to expect from Titleist irons.

"The new 712 line of AP irons represents another step forward in iron design," said Steve Pelisek, General Manager, Titleist Golf Clubs. "With the development of the first AP irons in 2007, we knew we had created something special - irons that incorporated a true blend of classic golf club aesthetics with modern playability, forgiveness and consistency. With the new 712 line we've taken this breakthrough technology to a new, game-changing level by increasing the stability and forgiveness without losing any workability or shot control."


Iron performance can best be measured, not only by the quality of shots produced by well-executed swings, but also by the quality of shots when less-than-ideal contact is made with the ball. From an engineering standpoint, the key to maximising shot quality on off-centre hits is weight distribution. Club designers learned that by placing more weight around the perimeter of the club they could reduce the amount that the club twists on off-centre hits. When the clubhead is more stable, off-centre hits still fly relatively straight and far. However, perimeter-weighted irons had an intrinsic drawback. In order to redistribute enough weight to exact a measurable performance advantage, the clubhead shape had to change. The typically larger heads of these irons with their wider soles and thicker toplines were visually unappealing to many serious golfers whose concept of an ideal iron is represented by the compact profile and sharper lines of a traditional forged blade iron.

The rules changed when Titleist introduced Advance Performance technology. By successfully integrating new materials in a new dual cavity, multi-component construction, Titleist not only launched an iron that delivered modern performance and playability, but one that would also satisfy the sensibilities of even the most ardent iron traditionalist.

"The original AP irons changed the way golfers thought about irons," said Dan Stone, Vice President, Research and Development, Titleist Golf Clubs. "AP technology opened up a host of new possibilities in which design aesthetics and performance no longer had to be mutually exclusive propositions. That original technology paved the way for the new advances that we've made with the new 712 line."


The improvements incorporated into the new AP irons came about as the result of continued research that indicated that serious golfers were looking for improvements in three main areas. First, most players wanted even greater refinements to the clubhead's profile. Both the new AP1 and AP2 models feature sleeker contours that result in a better address position. Players also expressed a desire for more forgiveness, to get more out of their miss-hits, or said another way, better distance control. Both the new AP1 and AP2 have been improved with internal weighting that utilises higher density tungsten in order to distribute mass more efficiently which increases the moment-of-inertia (MOI) without changing the CG location or the blade length. The higher MOI provides more consistent ball speed across the clubface and better distance control. Better distance control leads to more scoring opportunities and is the key to good iron play.

The third wish-list item that research uncovered was that players wanted more forgiveness without any loss of workability or shot control. Traditionally it has been thought that forgiveness and workability were mutually exclusive. The new AP irons prove that they are not.

"When speaking about iron workability, it's important to dispel the myth that adding forgiveness to an iron decreases its workability," explained Stone. "In the golf industry, when we talk about Moment of Inertia, we're referring to MOI-y, which is the heel/toe stability of the clubhead on off-centre impacts. The higher the MOI-y, the better the accuracy and distance on off-centre hits. But the most influential property affecting workability is the Moment of Inertia around the shaft axis, which is mainly driven by blade length and the location of the clubhead's center of gravity from the shaft axis. When we redesigned the 712 AP irons, we redistributed weight in the clubhead so that we not only increased clubhead MOI or forgiveness, we kept blade lengths the same and maintained the same CG distance from the shaft axis. This allows players to flight and shape shots."


The new 712 AP1 and 712 AP2 irons retain the dual cavity design and multi-material construction that is the key to their advanced performance. However, the designs have been significantly upgraded for more forgiveness, higher ball speeds on miss-hits and improved distance control. Additionally, the new AP1 features a new topline shape and progressively reduced blade lengths resulting in more traditional-looking short irons. Notable changes to the new AP2 include a new, tour-inspired square toe profile and reduced sole width in the short irons for more precise turf performance.

Both new AP models incorporate Titleist's Tuned Feel System, a co-molded insert of soft elastomer and aluminum plate. This insert has been specifically designed to improve the sound and feel of each new iron.

Extensive improvements to the new AP1 structure include a redesigned stainless steel sole-plate and integrated tungsten nickel sole weight that redistributes discretionary mass from the topline, centre bar and sole cradle to low in the head, resulting in increased stability and forgiveness. The new AP2 structure also makes use of a new steel cradle that holds tungsten weights located in the heel and toe, providing greater forgiveness on miss-hits and more consistent distance control.


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