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The Open 2016 - Round 1 Reports - Scores

Phil Mickelson leads with a record 63

Phil Mickelson was 16 feet away from a place in history he wouldn't have to share with anyone.

Fans watched from a rooftop balcony. Royal Troon members strained to see out the window from the clubhouse behind the 18th green. Jack Nicklaus usually doesn't watch golf on TV, but he made an exception for this moment.

In 436 majors held over the last 156 years, no one had ever shot 62.

That's still the case. By a fraction of an inch.

''I want to cry,'' Mickelson said.

Mickelson pointed his putter toward the hole and was ready to step into history Thursday in the British Open when his birdie putt turned sharply to the right at the mouth of the hole, just enough to ride the edge around the back of the cup and sit there, teasing him.

''You made a beautiful read and putt on that last hole but got absolutely stone-cold robbed,'' Nicklaus said in a message on Facebook.

Mickelson plopped his hand on his forehead in disbelief. His caddie, Jim ''Bones'' Mackay, was so stunned that he fell over backward.

''It was one of the best rounds I've ever played ... and yet I want to shed a tear right now,'' Mickelson said. ''That putt on 18 was an opportunity to do something historical. I knew it, and with a foot to go I thought I had done it. I saw that ball rolling right in the center. I went to go get it. I had that surge of adrenaline that I had just shot 62, and then I had the heartbreak that I didn't.''

No tears were necessary at Royal Troon, not after a round of 63 that was brilliant even by Lefty's standards, and certainly not after building a three-shot lead over Patrick Reed and Martin Kaymer on an ideal day by the Irish Sea.

Mickelson seized the moment with a birdie on the par-5 16th from a bunker short of the green, and a 4-iron to 15 feet for birdie on the par-3 17th to reach 8-under par. He knew no one had ever shot 62 in a major. He also knew he most likely would never get a chance like this.

''That would have been really something special,'' he said. ''So to have that putt lip out, that's going to sting for a while.''

Even with such a close call, Mickelson is in good company.

Nicklaus missed a putt just inside 3 feet for a 62 in the 1980 U.S. Open at Baltusrol. Greg Norman had to only two-putt from 30 feet for a 62 at Turnberry in the 1986 British Open and took three putts. Tiger Woods watched his 15-foot putt for 62 spin 270 degrees around the cup in the 2007 PGA Championship at Southern Hills. Nick Price's birdie putt for a 62 in the 1986 Masters dipped in and out of the cup.

Asked why there had never been a 62 in the major, Mickelson pointed to his putt.

''There's a curse,'' he said. ''Because that ball should have been in.''

It wasn't for a lack of effort. He went with a 6-iron to play a baby cut back toward the hole, and it worked out perfectly. He brought in his caddie and told him that ''I need your best read.'' Ernie Els did his part, putting out of turn to turn the stage over to Mickelson.

The pace was perfect. The putt looked perfect - until it wasn't. By a fraction.

''I saw that ball going in and I just had a good, clear vision of what was going to happen,'' he said. ''What I didn't see was what happened.''

And now, he faces a return to reality.

Of the seven previous players to open with a 63 in a major, only Nicklaus at the 1980 U.S. Open and Raymond Floyd at the 1982 PGA Championship went on to win.

Royal Troon might not be this gentle the rest of the week. The forecast was for strong wind and rain for Friday, especially when Mickelson and Kaymer play in the morning. Lefty was ready to embrace whatever came his way.

''One of the biggest challenges is when you shoot a round like this, you start expectations running through your head and so forth, and that's the one thing that I'll have to try to suppress and hold off,'' he said. ''We'll have three more rounds. We'll have varying conditions tomorrow. It's going to be very difficult.''

Eight Americans were among the top 11 on the leaderboard at Royal Troon, where they have won the Open the last six times. That group included Steve Stricker, the 49-year-old in his first major this year, and Justin Thomas, the 23-year-old in his first British Open.

Defending champion Zach Johnson had a chance to shoot 63 if he birdied the last two holes. He went bogey-bogey for a 67.

But this day was all about Mickelson, who never seriously came close to making bogey. He missed only three greens and two fairways, one on the 18th when he switched to a 3-wood and, realizing what was at stake, sent his shot toward a pot bunker.

It bounced just far enough left to avoid it. It looked as though everything was going to his way. Right until the final inch.

Big Four struggle to make an impression

The much-heralded 'Big Four' of golf failed to make an impression in the first round of the British Open on Thursday.

Young guns Jason Day, Dustin Johnson, Jordan Spieth and Rory McIlroy were unable to find their 'A games' and were eclipsed by 'golden oldie' Phil Mickelson who powered to the top of the Royal Troon leaderboard with an eight-under 63.

None of the 'Big Four' scored as well as little-known Belgian Thomas Pieters who is appearing in his first major championship and carded a 68.

Only one of the elite quartet matched the 69 of triple major winner Vijay Singh of Fiji who is 53.

McIlroy, 27, equaled Singh's score. The Northern Irishman appeared briefly on the leaderboard when he got to four-under after four birdies and five pars on the front nine.

But a double-bogey on 13 and a bogey on 14 ended his run. A lone birdie on 15 was the only bright spot on his back nine.

"If I would've stepped on the first tee and someone would have given me a 69 I probably would have taken it but if somebody had given me that score on the 10th I probably wouldn't have," McIlroy told reporters after a calm day on the Ayrshire coast.

"I knew today was a day where you had to make the most of the conditions because I don't think we're going to see the course like this for the rest of the week."

Johnson and Spieth went round in 71 -- eight shots behind the 46-year-old Mickelson -- and the same score as former U.S. Masters and British Open champion Mark O'Meara, 59.

Day toiled his way to a two-over 73. The high points of his round came early, when he birdied three and six, but they lost their luster as he accumulated bogeys on five, eight, nine and 18.

That was the same number of birdies and bogeys compiled by Mark Calcavecchia, another former British Open champion who is 56.

"The next three days are going to be pretty difficult," said world number one Day. "I've got a lot of work to do.

"Hopefully ... I can just slowly inch my way back into the tournament."

Patrick Reed delivers with a 66

There’s a point at which youthful bravado isn’t cute anymore, a point at which you’ve got to deliver on big talk and bigger attitude. Patrick Reed has just about run out the clock on the smug arrogance with which he rolled onto the PGA Tour.

But look at him now: unlikely standard-bearer for American golf in the Olympics. Gracious guest in Scotland. Clubhouse leader (for a little while, at least) after a five-under 66 in the first round of the British Open. Life moves pretty fast, huh?

At first glance, Reed’s an easy guy to hate. He damn sure looks like that I-can-top-that dude in your foursome, the guy at the bar who’s as likely to start a fight as buy everyone a round. He barreled onto the Tour with a swirl of rumors in his wake, including frustrated and enraged college teammates, whispers about on-course conduct, stories of relationships severed without explanation. He carried himself with confidence spilling into arrogance—Shane Ryan’s Slaying the Tiger includes an anecdote about how Reed used to introduce himself: “I’m Patrick Reed, and I’ll kick the [crap] out of you at golf any time you want.”

Adding to the ready-made villain narrative, he also entered the public eye at the same moment as the greatest gift to old-school golf fans since the 1986 Masters. Reed and Jordan Spieth arrived at the precipice of the PGA Tour at roughly the same time, and you couldn’t have scripted a better yin-and-yang of the future of golf. Spieth was polite, well-mannered, thoughtful, humble, a perfectly formed Ideal Golfer who sent the media swooning.

The two made for exactly the kind of story golf loves: either/or, good guy/bad guy, decorum/swagger. Reed drew first blood, defeating Spieth in a playoff at the Wyndham Championship in August 2013. Two wins later, after a victory at the WGC-Cadillac Championship at Doral in March 2014, Reed raised the ante, calling himself “one of the top five players in the world.” He compared himself to Tiger Woods and “the other legends of the game,” adding, “To come out in a field like this and to hold on wire to wire like that, I feel like I’ve proven myself.”

Later that year, Reed teamed with Spieth at the 2014 Ryder Cup, and their pairing was one of the few highlights in a United States meltdown that ended with Phil Mickelson and Tom Watson throwing postmatch press conference barbs at one another.

The Ryder Cup offered a chance for Reed to take his heel persona to the world stage. His 3-0-1 record was the best on either team, and during his Sunday singles matchup against Henrik Stenson, he shushed the Gleeneagles crowd en route to a victory. The big dog was starting to eat everything in sight.

Except, well … the big dog is a puppy when majors come around.

As Reed’s contemporaries won big, Reed spun his wheels. When Spieth won the 2015 Masters, Reed finished in a tie for 22nd. When Jason Day won the 2015 PGA Championship, Reed finished in a tie for 30th. When Dustin Johnson won this year’s U.S. Open, a tournament at which Reed was a trendy dark horse pick, Reed didn’t even see the weekend. To date, Reed has played in 10 majors, including this week, and has not finished in the top 10 in any of them.

At long last, that might change. Reed entered the week as an unexpected symbol of American golf, having proudly announced his intention to compete in Rio at a time when Spieth, Johnson, and many other notables were bailing out. He followed that good press by carding a 66 Thursday in round 1 of the British Open, tying the record for an Open first round at Troon and, of course, good for the clubhouse lead. (Phil Mickelson would take both for himself a few hours later with a 63.) Reed took every advantage of surprisingly ideal and highly un-Scottish scoring conditions—brilliant sunshine, mild winds—drained a 139-yard approach from the fairway on the third hole for eagle. He’d record five more birdies against two bogeys the rest of the round.

Reed appears to have an affinity for links golf, a love he traces back to 2006, when he played in the British Junior and stayed afterward to watch Tiger Woods’ early rounds at Hoylake. Woods had to get creative to win that week, and that approach stuck with Reed.

“Just watching the different shots that other players were hitting, I always thought it would be fun because I love to create shots and hit the funny things,” he said. “At home, we can’t do that. It’s too soft. So you can’t hit the stinger 2-iron and let it run, or the low hook chip shot and watch it bounce up a hill and kind of trickle over. Those aren’t things we can do at home. It’s more thick rough, take the ball in the air and try to stop it. So I feel like my creative side has been able to come out.”

There’s a lot of time, distance, wind, and rain between Reed and the Claret Jug. But he’s set up as well as anyone else in the field. It’s time, at long last, for Reed to deliver on all his talk.

Solid start for Rory McIlroy

Rory McIlroy sits in a good position after his opening round at the British Open, a two-under-par 69 in largely benign conditions in Troon keeping him in touch with the early leaders.

The Ulsterman was one of numerous players who enjoyed an excellent start on the front nine on Thursday morning, with four birdies taking him to the turn in 32.

On a day of glorious sunshine in south-west Scotland, the inward nine into the breeze blowing from the Firth of Clyde made the closing holes more challenging.

McIlroy duly notched a double-bogey six at the 13th and dropped another stroke at the short 14th but birdied 15 to make it a satisfactory return to the Open.

"It was good. I think if I would've stepped on the first tee and someone would have given me a 69, I probably would have taken it," McIlroy said after his round.

"But if somebody had given me that score on the 10th, I probably wouldn't have. But I knew today was a day where you had to make the most of the conditions because I don't think we're going to see the course like this for the rest of the week.

"I think the elements are going to be a bit of a challenge. But two under par, shoot something in the 60s, it's a solid start."

The four-time major winner was pleased to be able to focus on his bid for the Claret Jug after a build-up to the tournament dominated by his and numerous other stars' decision to withdraw from the Olympics.

He was also relieved to return to the championship after an ankle injury prevented him from defending the Claret Jug he won in 2014 when last year's Open was held at St Andrews.

"I missed the Open Championship last year, obviously. And I kept saying St Andrews was a venue I felt like I could do very well at, so it was tough to miss.

"But I felt like I figured out how to play Open Championships a little bit more over the last few years, and I feel like I'm more equipped to handle the elements a little bit better. It's a good start."

The 27-year-old's round included a welcome birdie at the iconic short eighth, the Postage Stamp. His two there came after he endured a nightmare time at the same hole during practice on Tuesday.

"It's great. I think the best par-threes in the world are all under 150 yards," he said.

"No matter if it took me six shots to get out of the bunker the other day and I made nine, it's a great golf hole. I think there should definitely be more holes like that in golf."

After going out in the morning on Thursday, McIlroy must wait until 2:37pm local time (1337 GMT) on Friday to begin his second round.

And he, like everyone else at Troon, is bracing himself for completely different weather conditions, with Friday's forecast for rain and stiff winds.

"Yeah, it doesn't look very good tomorrow morning. I'm hoping some of the weather forecasts I've seen are right and it's starting to clear up a little in the afternoon," McIlroy remarked with his fingers crossed.

"But it's the Open Championship, and you know coming in here you're going to have to battle the elements somewhat.

"I think you're looking at something at around eight or 10 under par that might win this tournament, and I felt like I got off to a good start in trying to achieve that."

Louis Oosthuizen aces the 13th

Louis Oosthuizen didn’t get off to the hottest start at the British Open on Thursday, failing to take advantage of any of the first six holes, which play the easiest at Royal Troon. He even dropped a shot at the 123-yard par-3 eighth and an understandable bogey on the difficult 10th.

The 2010 Open champion came to the par-3 14th, however, and turned around his round in a hurry.

From 167 yards away with a 6-iron, Oosthuizen hit a tight, low draw to the hole location. The ball landed a yard short and right of the hole, bounced left and in for a remarkable ace. Oosthuizen sent his hat flying as he and Padraig Harrington, one of his playing partners, celebrated.

The eagle got Oosthuizen to even par on the round.

Scores

1 USA Phil Mickelson -8 - Par 63 - - 63
T2 GER Martin Kaymer -5 - Par 66 - - 66
T2 USA Patrick Reed -5 - Par 66 - - 66
T4 USA Keegan Bradley -4 - Par 67 - - 67
T4 USA Tony Finau -4 - Par 67 - - 67
T4 USA Billy Horschel -4 - Par 67 - - 67
T4 USA Zach Johnson -4 - Par 67 - - 67
T4 DNK Soren Kjeldsen -4 - Par 67 - - 67
T4 USA Steve Stricker -4 - Par 67 - - 67
T4 ENG Andy Sullivan -4 - Par 67 - - 67
T4 USA Justin Thomas -4 - Par 67 - - 67
T12 ESP Rafael Cabrera-Bello -3 - Par 68 - - 68
T12 ESP Sergio Garcia -3 - Par 68 - - 68
T12 USA Bill Haas -3 - Par 68 - - 68
T12 JPN Yuta Ikeda -3 - Par 68 - - 68
T12 JPN Shugo Imahira -3 - Par 68 - - 68
T12 KOR Soo-Min Lee -3 - Par 68 - - 68
T12 BEL Thomas Pieters -3 - Par 68 - - 68
T12 ENG Justin Rose -3 - Par 68 - - 68
T12 SWE Henrik Stenson -3 - Par 68 - - 68
T12 RSA Richard Sterne -3 - Par 68 - - 68
T22 WAL Jamie Donaldson -2 - Par 69 - - 69
T22 USA Rickie Fowler -2 - Par 69 - - 69
T22 ARG Emiliano Grillo -2 - Par 69 - - 69
T22 JPN Kodai Ichihara -2 - Par 69 - - 69
T22 ENG Andrew Johnston -2 - Par 69 - - 69
T22 AUS Matt Jones -2 - Par 69 - - 69
T22 IND Anirban Lahiri -2 - Par 69 - - 69
T22 RSA Zander Lombard -2 - Par 69 - - 69
T22 NIR Rory McIlroy -2 - Par 69 - - 69
T22 ITA Francesco Molinari -2 - Par 69 - - 69
T22 AUS Adam Scott -2 - Par 69 - - 69
T22 FJI Vijay Singh -2 - Par 69 - - 69
T22 USA Gary Woodland -2 - Par 69 - - 69
T35 KOR Byeong-Hun An -1 - Par 70 - - 70
T35 RSA Branden Grace -1 - Par 70 - - 70
T35 IRL Padraig Harrington -1 - Par 70 - - 70
T35 ENG Tyrrell Hatton -1 - Par 70 - - 70
T35 USA Jim Herman -1 - Par 70 - - 70
T35 USA J.B. Holmes -1 - Par 70 - - 70
T35 KOR Kyung-tae Kim -1 - Par 70 - - 70
T35 USA Kevin Kisner -1 - Par 70 - - 70
T35 USA Justin Leonard -1 - Par 70 - - 70
T35 ITA Matteo Manassero -1 - Par 70 - - 70
T35 USA Ryan Moore -1 - Par 70 - - 70
T35 USA Kevin Na -1 - Par 70 - - 70
T35 SWE Alexander Noren -1 - Par 70 - - 70
T35 RSA Haydn Porteous -1 - Par 70 - - 70
T35 USA Webb Simpson -1 - Par 70 - - 70
T35 USA Bubba Watson -1 - Par 70 - - 70
T51 USA Kevin Chappell Par - Par 71 - - 71
T51 NIR Darren Clarke Par - Par 71 - - 71
T51 FRA Victor Dubuisson Par - Par 71 - - 71
T51 USA Jason Dufner Par - Par 71 - - 71
T51 RSA Ernie Els Par - Par 71 - - 71
T51 ENG Ryan Evans Par - Par 71 - - 71
T51 ENG Ross Fisher Par - Par 71 - - 71
T51 AUS Scott Hend Par - Par 71 - - 71
T51 USA Charley Hoffman Par - Par 71 - - 71
T51 THA Thongchai Jaidee Par - Par 71 - - 71
T51 ESP Miguel Angel Jimenez Par - Par 71 - - 71
T51 USA Dustin Johnson Par - Par 71 - - 71
T51 THA Phachara Khongwatmai Par - Par 71 - - 71
T51 USA Matt Kuchar Par - Par 71 - - 71
T51 SCO Colin Montgomerie Par - Par 71 - - 71
T51 USA Mark O'Meara Par - Par 71 - - 71
T51 RSA Louis Oosthuizen Par - Par 71 - - 71
T51 ENG Robert Rock Par - Par 71 - - 71
T51 ENG Matthew Southgate Par - Par 71 - - 71
T51 USA Jordan Spieth Par - Par 71 - - 71
T51 USA Daniel Summerhays Par - Par 71 - - 71
T51 USA Harold Varner III Par - Par 71 - - 71
T51 ENG Lee Westwood Par - Par 71 - - 71
T51 ENG Danny Willett Par - Par 71 - - 71
T75 AUS Greg Chalmers 1 - Par 72 - - 72
T75 BEL Nicolas Colsaerts 1 - Par 72 - - 72
T75 ENG David Coupland 1 - Par 72 - - 72
T75 USA Marco Dawson 1 - Par 72 - - 72
T75 ESP Scott Fernandez 1 - Par 72 - - 72
T75 AUS Marcus Fraser 1 - Par 72 - - 72
T75 AUS Nathan Holman 1 - Par 72 - - 72
T75 USA Smylie Kaufman 1 - Par 72 - - 72
T75 USA Chris Kirk 1 - Par 72 - - 72
T75 SCO Russell Knox 1 - Par 72 - - 72
T75 SCO Paul Lawrie 1 - Par 72 - - 72
T75 JPN Hideki Matsuyama 1 - Par 72 - - 72
T75 USA Jordan Niebrugge 1 - Par 72 - - 72
T75 DNK Thorbjorn Olesen 1 - Par 72 - - 72
T75 USA Ryan Palmer 1 - Par 72 - - 72
T75 AUS Rod Pampling 1 - Par 72 - - 72
T75 RSA Charl Schwartzel 1 - Par 72 - - 72
T75 JPN Hideto Tanihara 1 - Par 72 - - 72
T75 USA Jimmy Walker 1 - Par 72 - - 72
T94 NZL Steve Alker 2 - Par 73 - - 73
T94 USA Mark Calcavecchia 2 - Par 73 - - 73
T94 AUS Jason Day 2 - Par 73 - - 73
T94 ENG Luke Donald 2 - Par 73 - - 73
T94 USA Harris English 2 - Par 73 - - 73
T94 ENG Matthew Fitzpatrick 2 - Par 73 - - 73
T94 ENG Tommy Fleetwood 2 - Par 73 - - 73
T94 USA Russell Henley 2 - Par 73 - - 73
T94 ENG Paul Howard 2 - Par 73 - - 73
T94 KOR Sang-Hee Lee 2 - Par 73 - - 73
T94 SWE David Lingmerth 2 - Par 73 - - 73
T94 SCO Richie Ramsay 2 - Par 73 - - 73
T94 ENG Callum Shinkwin 2 - Par 73 - - 73
T94 USA Brandt Snedeker 2 - Par 73 - - 73
T94 USA Brendan Steele 2 - Par 73 - - 73
T94 RSA Brandon Stone 2 - Par 73 - - 73
T110 AUS Nick Cullen 3 - Par 74 - - 74
T110 USA Jim Furyk 3 - Par 74 - - 74
T110 USA James Hahn 3 - Par 74 - - 74
T110 ENG David Howell 3 - Par 74 - - 74
T110 SWE Rikard Karlberg 3 - Par 74 - - 74
T110 USA Colt Knost 3 - Par 74 - - 74
T110 AUS Marc Leishman 3 - Par 74 - - 74
T110 USA Jamie Lovemark 3 - Par 74 - - 74
T110 ESP Jon Rahm 3 - Par 74 - - 74
T110 USA Robert Streb 3 - Par 74 - - 74
T110 JPN Yosuke Tsukada 3 - Par 74 - - 74
T110 AUT Bernd Wiesberger 3 - Par 74 - - 74
T122 THA Kiradech Aphibarnrat 4 - Par 75 - - 75
T122 SWE Oskar Arvidsson 4 - Par 75 - - 75
T122 RSA George Coetzee 4 - Par 75 - - 75
T122 USA John Daly 4 - Par 75 - - 75
T122 USA Todd Hamilton 4 - Par 75 - - 75
T122 ENG James Heath 4 - Par 75 - - 75
T122 NED Joost Luiten 4 - Par 75 - - 75
T122 NIR Graeme McDowell 4 - Par 75 - - 75
T122 USA William McGirt 4 - Par 75 - - 75
T122 KOR Seung-yul Noh 4 - Par 75 - - 75
T122 FRA Clement Sordet 4 - Par 75 - - 75
T122 KOR Jeung-hun Wang 4 - Par 75 - - 75
T134 USA Brian Gay 5 - Par 76 - - 76
T134 ARG Fabian Gomez 5 - Par 76 - - 76
T134 USA Patton Kizzire 5 - Par 76 - - 76
T134 JPN Satoshi Kodaira 5 - Par 76 - - 76
T134 ITA Stefano Mazzoli 5 - Par 76 - - 76
T134 ENG James Morrison 5 - Par 76 - - 76
T134 ENG Anthony Wall 5 - Par 76 - - 76
T141 SWE Kristoffer Broberg 6 - Par 77 - - 77
T141 ENG Paul Casey 6 - Par 77 - - 77
T141 USA Ben Curtis 6 - Par 77 - - 77
T141 IRL Paul Dunne 6 - Par 77 - - 77
T141 JPN Yusaku Miyazato 6 - Par 77 - - 77
T141 USA Scott Piercy 6 - Par 77 - - 77
T141 SCO Marc Warren 6 - Par 77 - - 77
T148 ENG Scott Gregory 7 - Par 78 - - 78
T148 DNK Lasse Jensen 7 - Par 78 - - 78
T148 NZL Danny Lee 7 - Par 78 - - 78
T148 IRL Shane Lowry 7 - Par 78 - - 78
T152 AUS Steven Bowditch 8 - Par 79 - - 79
T152 ENG Jack Senior 8 - Par 79 - - 79
154 USA David Duval 11 - Par 82 - - 82
155 SCO Sandy Lyle 14 - Par 85 - - 85
RET ENG Chris Wood 3 - Par - - - 0




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