Golf Today - Over 80000 pages of golf information
Golf News

PGA Championship 2017 - Round 3 Reports - Scores

Kevin Kisner holds on to slim advantage

Even after his shot bounced high off a concrete bridge over a creek, Kevin Kisner wasn't in the clear at the PGA Championship.

Embed from Getty Images

His golf ball was buried in thick grass on a hill above the water. As he looked across to the 18th green at Quail Hollow, wondering how he could even keep it on the green, a leaderboard reminded him of how many players were suddenly in the mix at the final major of the year.

Kisner managed to keep the damage to a minimum in a calamity-filled final hour Saturday.

More importantly, he managed to keep the lead.

Two holes after hitting into the water on No. 16 to lose a two-shot lead, Kisner chopped out of the cabbage-like lie to the other side of the 18th green, then navigated a super slick 45-foot putt to close range to escape with bogey and a 1-over 72, giving him a one-shot lead over Hideki Matsuyama and Chris Stroud.

''I'm happy I'm in the position I'm in,'' Kisner said. ''I had a chance to run away from guys and take people out of the tournament that were four or five, six back. And I didn't do it. Now I'm in a dogfight tomorrow, and I have to be prepared for that.''

If the closing stretch taught him something, it was to prepare for anything.

Jason Day can attest to that. He wasted a remarkable rally with a peculiar decision to hit a shot from behind a tree. His feet slipped on the pine straw and the ball wound up in a waist-high flower bed. What followed was a penalty drop, a shot to the rough, another short of the green and a quadruple-bogey 8 that most likely ended his chances. He shot 77 and was in no mood to discuss the round.

Stroud three-putted the last two holes for bogey, one from off the 17th green. He managed a 71 and was in the final group Sunday, not bad for a guy who wasn't even eligible for the PGA Championship until he won his first PGA Tour event six days ago.

''It's just a dream come true to be here,'' he said.

Kisner had the lead going into the final round, a great spot to pursue his first major championship. He just doesn't like what he sees in his rearview mirror, where the players are a lot closer than they once appeared.

Matsuyama made only one birdie and wasted two good scoring chances on the back nine. He had a dull finish, which on this day allowed him to make up ground. With five straight pars at the end, he had a 73 and was one shot behind in his bid to deliver Japan its first major.

''I'm disappointed the way I played today,'' Matsuyama said. ''However, I'm happy to just to be one stroke back and still have a chance.''

Justin Thomas, the son of a PGA professional, had the right formula. He didn't drop a shot over the last 12 shots and shot a 69 to finish just two shots behind along with Louis Oosthuizen, who saved par on the 18th with a bold shot for a 71.

It was everyone else in the hunt that fell apart.

Rickie Fowler, quietly lurking with four birdies in an eight-hole stretch, failed to birdie the par-5 15th - the easiest hole at Quail Hollow - and followed with a three-putt bogey on the 16th, an 8-iron into the water for double bogey on the 17th, and a three-putt bogey from just over 20 feet on the 18th. That gave him a 73, and after getting within three shots, he trailed by six.

Paul Casey also was in position until his shot on 18 missed by a fraction and settled in the rough above the hole. His chip ran off the green, and he made double bogey. Casey played the final three holes in 4 over and shot 74. He was seven behind.

The shocker was Day, the former No. 1 player in the world and a PGA champion two years ago. He looked more like Jean Van de Velde, famous for his collapse in the 1999 British Open, except that Day was standing amid bushes of flowers instead of knee deep in the burn at Carnoustie.

Of the 15 players who remained under par, Oosthuizen is the only one who has won a major, and that was seven years ago. The South African had his own problems. His right arm tightened up on the front nine and he required a therapist to work on it. Then he hit a root on a shot with an 8-iron and bent the club, meaning he couldn't use it when he needed it late in his round.

He still has a chance to add to that British Open title at St. Andrews in 2010.

''It's the type of golf course you don't have to go out and make birdies. You just need to keep everything together,'' Oosthuizen said.

Kisner did that as well as anyone for so much of the day. He was rarely out of position except on the par-5 seventh when he hung a 3-iron to the right and near the hazard. He caught a decent lie and chipped close for his first birdie. And after ending a streak of 25 holes without a bogey, he two-putted the 14th green from 100 feet and two-putted the 15th green from 20 feet, both for birdies, to stretch his lead to two shots as players behind him were fading.

Kisner joined them with mistakes of his own, though he managed to keep his emotions in check.

''As soon as you think you're on top of things, it finds a way to kick you right in the face,'' Kisner said.

He was speaking about golf. He could have just as easily been talking about the final stretch at Quail Hollow.

Hideki Matsuyama feeling the pressure

Hideki Matsuyama has broad shoulders but is not finding it easy to carry the weight of an entire nation as he seeks to become the first Japanese man to win a major.

Embed from Getty Images

Matsuyama started the third round of the PGA Championship tied for the lead with Kevin Kisner but never got into gear, a bogey at the first setting the table for a pedestrian one-over-par 72.

That was still good enough to remain in contention, a stroke behind Kisner, who dropped three shots in the final three holes.

"Probably the pressure had something to do with it, being in the last group in a major tournament," said Matsuyama.

"But I haven't been spot-on all week, and the worries I had about my swing showed up today in the way I played.

"I'm disappointed the way I played today, however I'm happy to be one stroke back and still have a chance and looking forward to tomorrow."

Matsuyama is coming off a closing 61 that clinched a runaway victory at last week's WGC-Bridgestone Invitational. He said at the time he had shot the stunning score despit

Jordan Spieth feels PGA the toughest major

Jordan Spieth's hopes to become the youngest player to complete a career Grand Slam by winning the 99th PGA Championship vanished with a closing double bogey in Saturday's third round.

Embed from Getty Images

The 24-year-old American, who captured his third major title at last month's British Open, fired a par-71 Saturday to stand well off the lead in an event he says will be his most difficult major to capture.

"The PGA Championship, I think, is going to be the toughest for me," Spieth said after firing a par-71 Saturday. "If we look historically back on my career, I think I will play this tournament worse than the other three majors just in the way that it's set up."

World number two Spieth, who won the 2015 Masters and US Open, has two missed cuts, a 2015 runner-up effort and a share of 13th last year in his four prior PGA starts.

"I feel like my game truly suits the other three majors maybe more than a PGA," Spieth said. "But I believe we can play anywhere and can win anywhere. It's just a matter of having everything in sync at the right time."

That was not the case this week at Quail Hollow, where Spieth struggled with his putter until back-to-back birdies to close Saturday's front nine and three birdies in a row starting at the 14th.

"Any week you don't have a chance to win, you've fallen short of where you would like to be," Spieth said. "Disappointing would have been going home after two days."

But Spieth says there are things to be gained from every round, citing a strong final round at the US Open with building momentum for his British Open victory at Royal Birkdale.

"It was US Open Sunday, I was out of it, but I gathered a little something off that Sunday round that led to two wins and two tournaments after that including a major," Spieth said. "Just one round like that can do that. That's what I'm looking to do here."

And while he won't be the youngest, Spieth expects to have many more chances to join Jack Nicklaus, Tiger Woods, Gene Sarazen, Ben Hogan and Gary Player in completing the career Grand Slam.

"I didn't have it written in a diary from when I was young that I need to win a career grand slam as the youngest ever. That wasn't the goal," Spieth said.

"The goal was to try and win them all. The goal was to try and get on the PGA Tour and then from there see what happens. And yeah, I have a lot of opportunities."

Spieth said he did discover something that improved his putting, even if it wasn't enough to lift him into contention.

"I was trying to play aggressive to see how many birdies we could make," Spieth said. "Found a little something that I was trying out there. I felt very good about the way I was stroking it and the way I played the last 10 of the last 11 holes."

He wouldn't get into specifics, but added, "Where I have been searching a little bit, I found what I think was the solution. It led to a lot better strokes, therefore I can focus more on the speed."

Rollercoaster round for Jason Day

Jason Day reeled off three straight birdies and took a remarkable gamble that didn't pay off.

Embed from Getty Images

This Day was moving at the PGA Championship, all right - both up and down.

Day's quadruple bogey on the par-4 18th finished off a 6-over 77 on Saturday that left him at even par through three rounds of the tournament, in a tie for 16th place and seven strokes behind leader Kevin Kisner.

Day declined to speak to reporters as he left the clubhouse following an anything-but-boring back nine that included three birdies, two bogeys, a double bogey and that eight on the 18th.

His final hole might have been tough to explain.

Day was just four strokes back when his tee shot on the 494-yard hole veered behind a tree in some pine straw on the right side of the fairway. He tried a high-risk shot to hook it around the tree , and it landed in a bush, winding up unplayable.

After taking a drop near some portable toilets , he hit a flop shot over some trees into the fairway rough . His shot from that thick grass stopped 65 feet shy of the stick, and he three-putted .

''I didn't even know what he made. I wasn't keeping his score,'' said Kisner, who was in Day's group along with Hideki Matsuyama. ''I was pretty consumed with what the heck I was trying it do on the second shot. I had never seen a hole location short of a false front before. It's unfortunate. He played good coming in and then gave it all away, so that's tough.''

Matsuyama said through an interpreter that he had ''no words of advice'' for Day, ''but let's go get 'em tomorrow.''

By his high standards, Day has called this a poor season with only two top-10 finishes and no wins in 15 starts.

The world's former No. 1 player has dropped to seventh in the rankings, but came to Quail Hollow Club with what he described as slowly building confidence after finishing in a tie for 24th last week at Bridgestone. He's also had two consecutive strong showings at this event, winning it in 2015 and finishing second to Jimmy Walker at Baltusrol.

The 29-year-old Australian finished tied for 22nd at the Masters, missed the cut at the U.S. Open and was tied for 27th at the British Open.

It seemed like a promising sign that he was two strokes off the lead after two rounds, earning a spot in the final group - something that hadn't happened in a major championship since that victory two years ago at Whistling Straits.

Things started to go haywire right after he made the turn.

He recovered on the par-5 10th after pulling his tee shot into the rough, hitting a 75-yard third shot within 5 feet of the flagstick. His birdie putt caught the left edge of the cup and rolled all the way around it before spinning out. Day stood for a moment, one arm folded, with a disbelieving smile at his misfortune.

Day then yanked his tee shot on the par-4 12th toward a cart path left of the fairway, sent his shot from that position along that same cart path and placed his third stroke to the edge of the greenside bunker. His chip stopped about 10 feet from the hole and after that bogey putt went wide right, he tapped in for a double bogey that left him six strokes behind Kisner.

He followed a bogey on the par-3 13th with three straight birdies, rolling in a 40-foot putt on the 16th and offering a grin and a fist pump. A double bogey by Kisner on that hole helped Day cut his deficit in half, pulling within three strokes of the lead.

Then came a bogey on the 17th - and big trouble on the final hole.

Chris Stroud stays in the mix

Chris Stroud is known by friends as Mr. Positivity, but even he couldn't have imagined he'd be playing in the PGA Championship this week, let alone have a chance of win it.

Embed from Getty Images

Stroud has become the surprise story of the tournament, teeing off in the final paring on Sunday alongside tournament leader Kevin Kisner.

The fact that he's even here is an amazing story.

An 11-year PGA Tour veteran, the 35-year-old Stroud had played in 288 PGA Tour events but had never won until capturing the Barracuda Championship in incredible fashion last Sunday. He made three birdies and an eagle to forge his way into a three-way playoff at Montreaux Golf and Country Club and then won with a two-putt birdie on the second extra hole.

The win gave Stroud an automatic entry into the PGA Championship and a two-year exemption on the PGA Tour.

''To finally get a win was really magical,'' Stroud said. ''I'm still on cloud nine.''

Stroud, who is tied for second place at 6 under, one shot behind Kisner, said he won't change his approach on Sunday.

He borrowed a line from Kevin Costner's character in Bull Durham, saying ''don't mess with a streak.''

''I have the same everything I had last week,'' Stroud said. ''I have the same swing thoughts as last week. I have the same routine warming up. I'm not going to change anything.''

Despite his positive demeanor, Stroud admits he did get frustrated at times playing golf in the shadows of others like Tiger Woods, Phil Mickelson and Rory McIlroy.

During his first three or four years on tour he would get mad at himself when he didn't play well. But eventually he started to level out emotionally. Finally, about six months he said he came to terms with the notion that his career goals might never come to fruition.

''I said, 'Hey, I don't know if I'm ever going to win. I don't know if I can be No. 1 in the world. I don't know if I'm good enough. I don't know, anything,'' Stroud said. ''All I'm going to do is I'm going to do this every day. I'm going to go out there and play. I love this game. I'm going to respect it. I'm going to be grateful to be out here. I wake up every day and say, 'I'm grateful to have a chance to play. I'm healthy. And just let it fall into place.'''

For Stroud, playing in final pairing of a major tournament is a dream come true.

He knows he's going to be extremely nervous, but figures so will everyone else, especially with so many surprising names at the top of the leaderboard.

With 54 holes in the books, 14 of the top 15 names on the leaderboard for the 99th PGA Championship are in search of winning their first major championship. The lone exception is Louis Oosthuizen, who won the 2010 Open at St. Andrews.

''I've been waiting on this a long time,'' Stroud said. ''I didn't think it was going to take me this long, but I'm glad I'm here.''

Scores

1 USA Kevin Kisner -7 18 1 67 67 72 - 206
T2 USA Chris Stroud -6 18 Par 68 68 71 - 207
T2 JPN Hideki Matsuyama -6 18 2 70 64 73 - 207
T4 USA Justin Thomas -5 18 -2 73 66 69 - 208
T4 RSA Louis Oosthuizen -5 18 Par 70 67 71 - 208
6 USA Grayson Murray -3 18 -2 68 73 69 - 210
T7 ITA Francesco Molinari -2 18 3 73 64 74 - 211
T7 USA Gary Woodland -2 18 -2 68 74 69 - 211
T7 CAN Graham DeLaet -2 18 -3 70 73 68 - 211
T7 USA Patrick Reed -2 18 -2 69 73 69 - 211
T7 USA Scott Brown -2 18 -1 73 68 70 - 211
T12 USA Chez Reavie -1 18 -1 72 70 70 - 212
T12 USA Rickie Fowler -1 18 2 69 70 73 - 212
T12 NZL Ryan Fox -1 18 Par 75 66 71 - 212
T12 KOR Sung-Hoon Kang -1 18 Par 70 71 71 - 212
T16 AUS Jason Day Par 18 6 70 66 77 - 213
T16 ENG Paul Casey Par 18 3 69 70 74 - 213
T18 KOR Byeong-Hun An 1 18 3 71 69 74 - 214
T18 ENG Chris Wood 1 18 -1 72 72 70 - 214
T18 SWE Henrik Stenson 1 18 -1 74 70 70 - 214
T18 USA J. B. Holmes 1 18 -4 74 73 67 - 214
T18 USA James Hahn 1 18 Par 73 70 71 - 214
T18 USA Robert Streb 1 18 -1 74 70 70 - 214
T18 JPN Satoshi Kodaira 1 18 -4 71 76 67 - 214
T18 USA Tony Finau 1 18 Par 69 74 71 - 214
T26 USA Billy Horschel 2 18 -2 76 70 69 - 215
T26 USA Brian Harman 2 18 Par 69 75 71 - 215
T26 USA Brooks Koepka 2 18 3 68 73 74 - 215
T26 USA D. A. Points 2 18 3 68 73 74 - 215
T26 ENG Jordan Smith 2 18 -1 70 75 70 - 215
T26 USA Matt Kuchar 2 18 -1 71 74 70 - 215
T26 USA Pat Perez 2 18 -2 70 76 69 - 215
T26 USA Patrick Cantlay 2 18 1 72 71 72 - 215
T26 RSA Richard Sterne 2 18 -1 73 72 70 - 215
T26 USA Ryan Moore 2 18 2 71 71 73 - 215
T26 USA Zach Johnson 2 18 Par 71 73 71 - 215
T37 USA Bryson DeChambeau 3 18 1 73 71 72 - 216
T37 RSA Charl Schwartzel 3 18 1 74 70 72 - 216
T37 SWE David Lingmerth 3 18 Par 72 73 71 - 216
T37 ENG Ian Poulter 3 18 Par 74 71 71 - 216
T37 USA Jim Herman 3 18 1 69 75 72 - 216
T37 ESP Jon Rahm 3 18 Par 70 75 71 - 216
T37 USA Jordan Spieth 3 18 Par 72 73 71 - 216
T37 USA Kevin Chappell 3 18 -2 72 75 69 - 216
T37 USA Sean O'Hair 3 18 -1 71 75 70 - 216
T37 DEN Thorbjorn Olesen 3 18 Par 67 78 71 - 216
T47 USA Bill Haas 4 18 2 75 69 73 - 217
T47 USA Bud Cauley 4 18 3 69 74 74 - 217
T47 USA Dustin Johnson 4 18 2 70 74 73 - 217
T47 USA Jamie Lovemark 4 18 1 74 71 72 - 217
T47 USA Jason Kokrak 4 18 1 75 70 72 - 217
T47 USA Keegan Bradley 4 18 2 74 70 73 - 217
T47 USA Kelly Kraft 4 18 Par 73 73 71 - 217
T47 USA Lucas Glover 4 18 1 75 70 72 - 217
T47 AUS Marc Leishman 4 18 Par 75 71 71 - 217
T47 NIR Rory McIlroy 4 18 2 72 72 73 - 217
T47 IRL Shane Lowry 4 18 3 74 69 74 - 217
T47 USA Steve Stricker 4 18 1 75 70 72 - 217
T59 SWE Alexander Noren 5 18 4 74 69 75 - 218
T59 USA Jason Dufner 5 18 1 74 72 72 - 218
T59 ENG Tommy Fleetwood 5 18 2 70 75 73 - 218
T59 USA Webb Simpson 5 18 1 76 70 72 - 218
63 USA Charley Hoffman 6 18 2 75 71 73 - 219
T64 USA Daniel Summerhays 7 18 6 76 67 77 - 220
T64 JPN Hideto Tanihara 7 18 3 71 75 74 - 220
T64 KOR Kyung-Tae Kim 7 18 4 73 72 75 - 220
T64 ENG Lee Westwood 7 18 4 73 72 75 - 220
T68 AUS Adam Scott 8 18 3 71 76 74 - 221
T68 IND Anirban Lahiri 8 18 5 72 73 76 - 221
T68 USA Cody Gribble 8 18 3 72 75 74 - 221
T68 RSA Dylan Frittelli 8 18 6 73 71 77 - 221
72 USA Russell Henley 10 18 6 75 71 77 - 223
T73 USA Omar Uresti 11 18 9 74 70 80 - 224
T73 FIJ Vijay Singh 11 18 8 75 70 79 - 224
75 USA Charles Howell III 12 18 7 78 69 78 - 225
CUT CAN Adam Hadwin Par - -13 79 76 - - 155
CUT USA Adam Rainaud Par - -17 81 78 - - 159
CUT USA Alex Beach Par - -17 79 80 - - 159
CUT FRA Alexander Levy Par - -7 75 74 - - 149
CUT ENG Andy Sullivan Par - -10 78 74 - - 152
CUT AUT Bernd Wiesberger Par - -6 73 75 - - 148
CUT RSA Branden Grace Par - -9 77 74 - - 151
CUT RSA Brandon Stone Par - -17 79 80 - - 159
CUT USA Brendan Steele Par - -8 74 76 - - 150
CUT USA Bubba Watson Par - -7 77 72 - - 149
CUT AUS Cameron Smith Par - -15 75 82 - - 157
CUT USA Chris Kirk Par - -14 80 76 - - 156
CUT ENG Chris Moody Par - -17 81 78 - - 159
CUT USA Daniel Berger Par - -7 73 76 - - 149
CUT NZL Danny Lee Par - -12 76 78 - - 154
CUT ENG Danny Willett Par - -10 73 79 - - 152
CUT USA David McNabb Par - -14 78 78 - - 156
CUT USA David Muttitt Par - -25 84 83 - - 167
CUT USA Davis Love III Par - -11 78 75 - - 153
CUT ARG Emiliano Grillo Par - -10 78 74 - - 152
CUT RSA Ernie Els Par - -8 80 70 - - 150
CUT PAR Fabrizio Zanotti Par - -11 80 73 - - 153
CUT NIR Graeme McDowell Par - -7 73 76 - - 149
CUT USA Greg Gregory Par - -11 77 76 - - 153
CUT CHN Haotong Li Par - -6 73 75 - - 148
CUT USA Hudson Swafford Par - -7 77 72 - - 149
CUT USA J. J. Wood Par - -14 78 78 - - 156
CUT USA Jamie Broce Par - -15 79 78 - - 157
CUT USA Jaysen Hansen Par - -12 84 70 - - 154
CUT KOR Jeung-Hun Wang Par - -6 73 75 - - 148
CUT VEN Jhonattan Vegas Par - -8 78 72 - - 150
CUT USA Jim Furyk Par - -10 76 76 - - 152
CUT USA Jimmy Walker Par - -8 81 69 - - 150
CUT USA John Daly Par - -11 74 79 - - 153
CUT SWE Jonas Blixt Par - -9 74 77 - - 151
CUT NED Joost Luiten Par - -7 76 73 - - 149
CUT ENG Justin Rose Par - -6 76 72 - - 148
CUT USA Kenny Pigman Par - -13 76 79 - - 155
CUT USA Kevin Na Par - -6 79 69 - - 148
CUT USA Kyle Stanley Par - -10 76 76 - - 152
CUT ENG Luke Donald Par - -7 76 73 - - 149
CUT USA Luke List Par - -7 75 74 - - 149
CUT CAN Mackenzie Hughes Par - -8 78 72 - - 150
CUT SCO Martin Laird Par - -7 77 72 - - 149
CUT USA Matt Dobyns Par - -12 76 78 - - 154
CUT ENG Matthew Fitzpatrick Par - -8 76 74 - - 150
CUT USA Mike Small Par - -17 80 79 - - 159
CUT BEL Nicolas Colsaerts Par - -8 75 75 - - 150
CUT ESP Pablo Larrazabal Par - -9 77 74 - - 151
CUT IRL Padraig Harrington Par - -9 79 72 - - 151
CUT USA Patrick Rodgers Par - -14 79 77 - - 156
CUT USA Paul Claxton Par - -23 82 83 - - 165
CUT USA Peter Uihlein Par - -6 74 74 - - 148
CUT USA Phil Mickelson Par - -11 79 74 - - 153
CUT ESP Rafael Cabrera Bello Par - -7 74 75 - - 149
CUT USA Rich Beem Par - -12 82 72 - - 154
CUT USA Rich Berberian Jr Par - -11 79 74 - - 153
CUT AUS Rod Pampling Par - -14 77 79 - - 156
CUT USA Rod Perry Par - -21 82 81 - - 163
CUT ENG Ross Fisher Par - -6 75 73 - - 148
CUT SCO Russell Knox Par - -8 77 73 - - 150
CUT USA Ryan Vermeer Par - -19 82 79 - - 161
CUT USA Scott Hebert Par - -15 83 74 - - 157
CUT AUS Scott Hend Par - -6 72 76 - - 148
CUT ESP Sergio Garcia Par - -8 75 75 - - 150
CUT USA Shaun Micheel Par - -8 73 77 - - 150
CUT DEN Soren Kjeldsen Par - -9 73 78 - - 151
CUT AUS Stuart Deane Par - -23 84 81 - - 165
CUT DEN Thomas Bjorn Par - -14 79 77 - - 156
CUT BEL Thomas Pieters Par - -14 79 77 - - 156
CUT THA Thongchai Jaidee Par - -11 80 73 - - 153
CUT ENG Tyrrell Hatton Par - -7 77 72 - - 149
CUT USA Wesley Bryan Par - -10 74 78 - - 152
CUT USA William McGirt Par - -8 77 73 - - 150
CUT USA Xander Schauffele Par - -13 74 81 - - 155
CUT KOR Yong-Eun Yang Par - -13 76 79 - - 155
CUT KOR Young-Han Song Par - -15 80 77 - - 157
CUT JPN Yuta Ikeda Par - -9 72 79 - - 151
RET ENG Andrew Johnston Par - 64 78 - - - 78
RET USA Brian Smock Par - 65 77 - - - 77
RET KOR Si-Woo Kim Par - 63 79 - - - 79

 





RSM Classic: Austin Cook claims first PGA Tour title

DP World Tour Championship: Tommy Fleetwood wins Order of Merit

Latest Official World Golf Ranking

Current European Tour Race to Dubai Standings

Current PGA Tour FedEx Cup Standings



A Time For Teaching Warily

Ai Signs Off Amid Accolades

A Golfer Who Could Inspire A Nation

By ceding control Lewis conjures a miracle

Europe’s Solheim Glass Is Half Full

Feeling The Love In Iowa

Hall And Ko Bide Their Time

Park’s Victory A Powerful Indicator

Father’s Spirit Buoys Kang

Gender Mixing A Mixed Bag

Paul Casey rejoins the European Tour

Tiger Woods to return at Hero World Challenge

Pelley Makes Good Grades

Thompson Wraps Up A Season Of ‘What-Ifs’

A Perpetual Glow Returns At Sea Island

An Architect’s Most Inspiring Creation

Amateur: Horsfield Soars Through European Tour Q-School

Ping launches iBlade irons

TaylorMade Golf M2 Irons

New SM6 Vokey Design Wedges

Titleist launch new Scotty Cameron Select putters

Titleist launch DT TruSoft golf ball

adidas Golf launch Tour360 Boost

SuperStroke introduces new Pistol GT putter grip

Do you struggle to take your ‘range game’ onto the golf course?

© Golftoday.co.uk 1996-2017 - Terms & Conditions - Privacy Policy - About Us - Advertise - Classifieds - Newsletter - Contact Us