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PGA Championship 2017 - Round 4 Reports - Scores

Justin Thomas rallies to win first major

Justin Thomas remembers hearing the roar before he ever saw the shot.

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He had access to the clubhouse at Valhalla in 2000 as the 7-year-old son of a PGA professional, and the thunder from the gallery reached his ears before the TV showed Tiger Woods making the most important putt of his career at that PGA Championship.

Thomas was barely big enough to dream of playing against the best that day. Now his name is on the same Wanamaker Trophy.

Thomas closed with a 3-under 68 on Sunday at Quail Hollow to emerge from the shadow of Jordan Spieth, his longtime friend, and capture his first major that belonged as much to him as the two generations of PGA professionals that came before him.

''As a kid growing up, you want to win all the majors. You want to win any major,'' Thomas said after his two-shot victory. ''For me, the PGA definitely had a special place in my heart, and maybe a special drive. It's just a great win for the family, and it's a moment we'll never forget - all of us.''

On this day, the cheers were for him.

They gave him chills when his 8-foot birdie putt teetered on the edge of the 10th hole for 12 seconds before it finally dropped, when he chipped in from 40 feet on the 13th hole to seize control Sunday, and when he fired a 7-iron from 221 yards over the water to a peninsula green that all but sealed the victory.

Even more special than the trophy was seeing his father, Mike Thomas, walk toward with arms wide to wrap around his only son. Thomas is the longtime pro at Harmony Landing outside Louisville, Kentucky and a former board member of the PGA of America. His father, Paul Thomas, is a 60-year PGA pro and the first person his grandson called.

The week began with Spieth's quest for a career Grand Slam. He was at the 18th green late Sunday afternoon, but only so he could celebrate the moment with Thomas, close friends since they were 14.

''So awesome, dude,'' Spieth told him.

Thomas was every bit of that.

With five players still in the mix on the back nine, Thomas surged ahead by chipping in for birdie and holding his nerve down the stretch as his challengers eventually faded, one after another.

Hideki Matsuyama, bidding to become the first player from Japan to win a major, recovered from back-to-back bogeys with birdies on the 14th and 15th holes to get within one shot. But the championship turned on the 16th hole.

Thomas faced a 6-foot par putt to stay at 8 under. Matsuyama caught a good lie over the green and chipped to 5 feet. Thomas wasted no time over the putt and drilled it in the center of cup. Matsuyama missed and was two shots behind.

''The last major of the year, and I was in contention,'' said Matsuyama, a runner-up at the U.S. Open. ''All I can do is try harder next time.''

Thomas sealed it with that 7-iron on the 17th that was so pure that he let the club twirl through his hands as he watched it clear the water and roll out to 15 feet. The birdie putt curled in and his lead was up to three going to the 18th. A final bogey only affected the score.

Thomas finished at 8-under 276 for his fourth victory of the year.

''I can't put it into words,'' Thomas said about his PGA of America heritage. ''I wish my grandpa could be here for it. It's so special to get it done. I'm glad we have a trophy now.''

Kevin Kisner was the last one who had a chance to catch him. But he three-putted from 100 feet on the 16th for bogey, couldn't birdie the 17th from long range and hit his second shot into the water and finished with a double bogey. Kisner, the 54-hole leader, played the final three holes in 6 over on the weekend. He closed with a 74.

''That's not going to be fun to look at,'' he said of his weekend finish over the brutal closing stretch at Quail Hollow. ''I thought I had to get to 10 (under) starting the day to win, and that was about right. I had every opportunity. I just didn't finish it off.''

Matsuyama also hit into the water on No. 18 and made bogey for a 72 to finish three back.

Louis Oosthuizen (70), Patrick Reed (67) and Francesco Molinari (67) tied for second, though none had a chance to win playing the 18th. Oosthuizen holed a 50-foot birdie putt on the 18th that made him a runner-up in all four majors.

For Reed, it was his first top 10 in a major.

Thomas began his move with a 35-foot birdie putt on No. 9, and then caught two breaks on the par-5 10th. His tee shot sailed left into a tree and bounced out into the fairway. Then, his 8-foot birdie putt hung on the left edge of the cup until gravity finally took over. The rule allows a player reasonable time to get to the cup, so it dropped well within the 10-second limit.

Thomas gets referred to endlessly as Spieth's best friend because Spieth, who is 3 months younger, has done so much so quickly. Their friendship dates to France when they represented the U.S. in the Evian Junior Masters. Thomas won that 36-hole event.

Ten years later, they have won consecutive majors and head into the FedEx Cup playoffs battling for PGA Tour player of the year.

Thomas won both Hawaii events at the start of the year, shooting a 59 in the Sony Open and setting the 72-hole record on the PGA Tour. He said then his goals were high. And how are they now?

''Let you know when the year's over,'' he said.

Major eludes Kevin Kisner and Hideki Matsuyama

Kevin Kisner and Hideki Matsuyama spent a lot of time atop the leaderboard at the PGA Championship.

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Just not when it mattered most.

Kisner, who led or shared the lead after each of the first three rounds, wound up in in a tie for seventh place. Matsuyama finished one stroke better than Kisner, in a tie for fifth place, after sharing the 36-hole lead and starting the final round one stroke back.

''The last major of the year, and I was in contention,'' Matsuyama said through an interpreter. ''All I can do is just try harder next time.''

Kisner shot a 3-over 74 on Sunday and finished four strokes behind winner Justin Thomas. Matsuyama shot 72 in the final round and finished at 5 under for the tournament.

The leaderboard was full of players who have never won a major championship - of the top eight finishers, only Louis Oosthuizen arrived at Quail Hollow Club with one - so it seemed inevitable that someone would claim one for the first time.

Kisner and Matsuyama hoped it would be them. Especially at the point in the round when they both were part of a five-way tie for first along with Thomas, Francesco Molinari and Chris Stroud.

''I really liked the way I started out, hitting the ball solid and giving myself a lot of good looks,'' Kisner said. ''Just not making the putts that I need to make to win major championships.''

Kisner missed six putts inside of 15 feet - three from 10 feet or closer - during his final round.

''I didn't make the putts that I'd been making the first two days over the weekend,'' he said. ''A lot of misses inside of 10 feet, and at some point the length is going to catch up with me and guys that hit it 30 (yards) by me are going to have an advantage if I'm not making the putts inside of 10 feet.''

Kisner was humming right along , shooting 67s in each of his first two rounds. Matsuyama followed a first-round 70 with a 64, joining Kisner in the lead at 8 under - the first time for either player to be atop the leaderboard after any round of a major.

Kisner's 72 in the third round was good enough to give him a one-stroke lead entering the final day, though he sensed - rightfully - that his pursuers were gaining on him.

And when he found trouble on the seventh hole, they caught him.

His fade on the par-5 hit the water, and after he two-putted for a bogey, he found himself at 6 under and trailing for the first time since Thursday afternoon, having been passed by Matsuyama.

The Japanese star fell off the pace during a turbulent back nine that included five bogeys - including one on the 16th in which his par putt lipped off the left edge of the cup. That dropped him two strokes behind Thomas.

''The course played tough,'' Matsuyama said. ''The pins were receptive, though, more than yesterday. I was just disappointed the way I played.''

Quail Hollow's fabled Green Mile three-hole finishing stretch also gave Kisner trouble in each of his final two cracks at it.

He had two double bogeys, two bogeys and two pars on Saturday and Sunday after playing it at a combined 1 under during the first two rounds.

''That's not going to be fun to look at,'' Kisner said. ''I thought I had to get a 10 (under) starting the day to win, and that was about right, so I had every opportunity. I just didn't finish it off.''

Rory McIlroy out indefinitely with back pain

The lingering pain Rory McIlroy felt when he finished the PGA Championship was not just about ending another year without a major.

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McIlroy revealed that he has felt spasms in a muscle in his upper back the last few weeks, and he's not sure when he will play next. It could be in a few weeks when the FedEx Cup playoffs begin. It could be sometime next year.

''I have a good bit of time to get healthy and address a few things going forward,'' McIlroy said. ''As I said, the next big thing is April, and that's really what my focus will be on from now until then.''

April is the Masters, the only major keeping McIlroy from the career Grand Slam.

McIlroy now has gone three years since his last major title at Valhalla in the PGA Championship. This year was all about injuries, and apparently he's not over them yet.

''Right now I can feel my left rhomboid going into spasm,'' McIlroy said after closing with a 3-under 68 at Quail Hollow. ''It's sort of the way it has been the last few weeks. I have upped my practice coming into these two events because I wanted to feel like I was in a good place in my game.''

He was three shots behind going into the final round at the Bridgestone Invitational last week until Hideki Matsuyama ran away with it. At the PGA Championship, he was slowed by bad stretches in the middle of his rounds that never allowed him to get under par.

''It's a tough one because I go out there and play and shoot decent scores,'' McIlroy said. ''But when I come off the course, I feel my left rhomboid going into spasm. (The) inside of my left arm goes numb. So I don't know what to do. I've got this next week off to assess what I need to go forward.''

McIlroy has headed home to Northern Ireland and planned to meet with his trainer to figure out the next step.

Along with failing to win a major for the third straight year, McIlroy hasn't won anywhere around the world since he won the Tour Championship last September to capture the FedEx Cup and its $10 million prize.

But it was a tough year from the start. He discovered a slight rib fracture after a playoff loss in the South African Open and he took seven weeks off to let it heal. He got married after the Masters, and the pain returned at The Players Championship in May. McIlroy believes he practiced too much too soon, and he said he would have to spend the rest of the year managing his practice time and his fitness.

But he didn't have many answers when he left Quail Hollow.

McIlroy said the pain wasn't as bad as it was early in the year at the Players, when he said it really flared up on him. But it's still there.

''I can feel it,'' he said. ''I can play 18 holes. I warm up, it's OK. But once I get done, having to go through the whole routine of getting it ready to go again the next day, you shouldn't have to do that. If it was injury-free, that wouldn't happen.''

The FedEx Cup playoffs feature four tournaments in five weeks starting on Aug. 24. He also has European Tour membership, which includes late-season events in Turkey, South Africa and Dubai.

''Look, I don't know what I'm going to do,'' he said. ''You might not see me until next year. You might see me in a couple of weeks' time. It really depends.''

McIlroy believes he can play well, put good scores together and win tournaments. His concern is that he doesn't think he can contend on a regular basis unless he gets 100 percent healthy, and that's not where he is now.

If he's that concerned about the injury, why play at all?

McIlroy paused for the longest time.

''I don't know,'' he said. ''I feel like a sense of ... not duty, but I've missed a lot of time already. If I'm capable of playing, I feel like, 'Why shouldn't you?' But then at the same time, if you are not capable of playing at your best, why should you play? We'll see what happens.''

Japanese turn out for Hideki Matsuyama

Hideki Matsuyama was in the thick of the battle for the PGA Championship at Quail Hollow on Sunday but finished three back in his quest to become the first Japanese male to win a golf major.

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Matsuyama was locked in a five-way tie for the lead early on the back nine but some wayward approach shots led to bogeys, while American playing companion Justin Thomas caught fire to win the title by two shots.

The crowd at Quail Hollow hollered loud encouragement for 24-year-old Thomas, but there were also cheers for Matsuyama, who was followed by scores of Japanese media, television crews, photographers and reporters, every step of the way.

Japanese golf fans also turned out to support the 25-year-old and perhaps witness an historic breakthrough.

"If he wins, it will be the first time for a Japanese champion in a major," Tommy, on a vacation to the United States from Kobe, told Reuters at the 13th hole. "Japanese people are hoping he can win to get the victory today."

Tommy, who wore a Srixon cap just like Matsuyama, said a victory by Matsuyama could have a big impact on golf in Japan.

"When Kei Nishikori, the tennis player, a few years ago was a finalist at the U.S. Open most of the younger generation joined in playing tennis. I think the same thing is going to happen."

Matsuyama bogeyed the 13th for his third successive bogey but the bounced back with two birdies.

Meg, sitting near the tee box at the 16th, was at the tournament with her American husband and their two children. She said she was most interested in watching Matsuyama.

"I’m sure everybody is watching him now right now on TV and everybody’s proud of him," said Meg, who is from Tokyo.

Trailing by three at the last, Matsuyama fired a bold shot at the pin from long distance and just missed holing it, drawing a loud groan from the thousands packed around the green. He finished with a one-over 72.

Afterwards, Matsuyama was emotional about his near miss at claiming Japan's first men's major.

"I'm very, very disappointed," a teary-eyed Matsuyama told reporters. "I was in the lead. I didn't think I would feel pressure. But there was pressure.

"Maybe this experience is what I need to be winning the next time."

Two Japanese fans sitting behind the 18th green said they were proud of him.

"He did a great job. It was wonderful. He tried and he kept his concentration to the 18th hole. We are proud of him," said Emiko Suzuki, sitting alongside her husband.

Johnny, who emigrated from Nagoya with Emiko to live in Henderson, North Carolina, remained a strong supporter of Matsuyama.

"I’m confident he will be the first Japanese man to win a major," he said. "It will be soon."

Louis Oosthuizen completes runner up slam

While Jordan Spieth failed in his bid to become the youngest player to win all four majors, South Africa's Louis Oosthuizen completed a somewhat unwelcome career grand slam of his own on Sunday with his second-place finish at the PGA Championship.

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Oosthuizen, who finished tied for second behind Justin Thomas alongside Francesco Molinari and Patrick Reed, lost a playoff to Bubba Watson at the 2012 Masters, another playoff to Zach Johnson at the British Open in 2015 and tied for second behind Dustin Johnson at that year's U.S. Open too.

Oosthuizen had flashed into contention late in the final round on Sunday when he pitched in for eagle from 20 yards at the par-five 15th at Quail Hollow, but a long three-putt bogey from nearly 100 feet at the 16th ended his hopes.

"I gave it everything I had coming in," he said. "I left myself with an impossible first putt on 16. I mean, I didn't really make any putts the whole round.

"The only putt I made was on the last hole (for birdie)."

That five-footer gave Oosthuizen a round of 70 and a six-under 278 total, two strokes behind Thomas.

Oosthuizen's victory at the 2010 British Open, when he finished seven strokes clear, suggested the floodgates were about to open for the sweet-swinging South African but the 34-year-old has not kicked on in the majors the way many had expected.

Oosthuizen is in fine company with his runner-up slam, joining the likes of Greg Norman, who lost playoffs in all four majors.

Scores

1 USA Justin Thomas -8 - 73 66 69 68 276
T2 ITA Francesco Molinari -6 - 73 64 74 67 278
T2 RSA Louis Oosthuizen -6 - 70 67 71 70 278
T2 USA Patrick Reed -6 - 69 73 69 67 278
T5 JPN Hideki Matsuyama -5 - 70 64 73 72 279
T5 USA Rickie Fowler -5 - 69 70 73 67 279
T7 CAN Graham DeLaet -4 - 70 73 68 69 280
T7 USA Kevin Kisner -4 - 67 67 72 74 280
T9 USA Chris Stroud -1 - 68 68 71 76 283
T9 AUS Jason Day -1 - 70 66 77 70 283
T9 ENG Jordan Smith -1 - 70 75 70 68 283
T9 USA Matt Kuchar -1 - 71 74 70 68 283
T13 USA Brian Harman Par - 69 75 71 69 284
T13 USA Brooks Koepka Par - 68 73 74 69 284
T13 USA Dustin Johnson Par - 70 74 73 67 284
T13 SWE Henrik Stenson Par - 74 70 70 70 284
T13 USA James Hahn Par - 73 70 71 70 284
T13 AUS Marc Leishman Par - 75 71 71 67 284
T13 ENG Paul Casey Par - 69 70 74 71 284
T13 USA Ryan Moore Par - 71 71 73 69 284
T13 USA Scott Brown Par - 73 68 70 73 284
T22 USA Chez Reavie 1 - 72 70 70 73 285
T22 USA Gary Woodland 1 - 68 74 69 74 285
T22 USA Grayson Murray 1 - 68 73 69 75 285
T22 ENG Ian Poulter 1 - 74 71 71 69 285
T22 USA Robert Streb 1 - 74 70 70 71 285
T22 NIR Rory McIlroy 1 - 72 72 73 68 285
T28 KOR Byeong-Hun An 2 - 71 69 74 72 286
T28 USA J. B. Holmes 2 - 74 73 67 72 286
T28 USA Jordan Spieth 2 - 72 73 71 70 286
T28 USA Pat Perez 2 - 70 76 69 71 286
T28 RSA Richard Sterne 2 - 73 72 70 71 286
T33 USA Bryson DeChambeau 3 - 73 71 72 71 287
T33 USA Bud Cauley 3 - 69 74 74 70 287
T33 ENG Chris Wood 3 - 72 72 70 73 287
T33 USA Jamie Lovemark 3 - 74 71 72 70 287
T33 USA Jason Kokrak 3 - 75 70 72 70 287
T33 USA Keegan Bradley 3 - 74 70 73 70 287
T33 USA Kevin Chappell 3 - 72 75 69 71 287
T33 USA Lucas Glover 3 - 75 70 72 70 287
T33 USA Patrick Cantlay 3 - 72 71 72 72 287
T33 USA Sean O'Hair 3 - 71 75 70 71 287
T33 USA Webb Simpson 3 - 76 70 72 69 287
T44 USA Jim Herman 4 - 69 75 72 72 288
T44 KOR Sung-Hoon Kang 4 - 70 71 71 76 288
T44 DEN Thorbjorn Olesen 4 - 67 78 71 72 288
T44 USA Tony Finau 4 - 69 74 71 74 288
T48 USA Billy Horschel 5 - 76 70 69 74 289
T48 RSA Charl Schwartzel 5 - 74 70 72 73 289
T48 USA Charley Hoffman 5 - 75 71 73 70 289
T48 JPN Satoshi Kodaira 5 - 71 76 67 75 289
T48 IRL Shane Lowry 5 - 74 69 74 72 289
T48 USA Zach Johnson 5 - 71 73 71 74 289
T54 USA Bill Haas 6 - 75 69 73 73 290
T54 USA D. A. Points 6 - 68 73 74 75 290
T54 NZL Ryan Fox 6 - 75 66 71 78 290
T54 USA Steve Stricker 6 - 75 70 72 73 290
T58 USA Jason Dufner 7 - 74 72 72 73 291
T58 ESP Jon Rahm 7 - 70 75 71 75 291
T58 USA Kelly Kraft 7 - 73 73 71 74 291
T61 AUS Adam Scott 8 - 71 76 74 71 292
T61 ENG Tommy Fleetwood 8 - 70 75 73 74 292
T63 USA Cody Gribble 9 - 72 75 74 72 293
T63 SWE David Lingmerth 9 - 72 73 71 77 293
T63 RSA Dylan Frittelli 9 - 73 71 77 72 293
66 FIJ Vijay Singh 10 - 75 70 79 70 294
T67 SWE Alexander Noren 11 - 74 69 75 77 295
T67 JPN Hideto Tanihara 11 - 71 75 74 75 295
T67 KOR Kyung-Tae Kim 11 - 73 72 75 75 295
T67 ENG Lee Westwood 11 - 73 72 75 75 295
T71 USA Daniel Summerhays 12 - 76 67 77 76 296
T71 USA Russell Henley 12 - 75 71 77 73 296
T73 USA Charles Howell III 13 - 78 69 78 72 297
T73 USA Omar Uresti 13 - 74 70 80 73 297
75 IND Anirban Lahiri 15 - 72 73 76 78 299
CUT AUT Bernd Wiesberger 6 - 73 75 - - 148
CUT CHN Haotong Li 6 - 73 75 - - 148
CUT KOR Jeung-Hun Wang 6 - 73 75 - - 148
CUT ENG Justin Rose 6 - 76 72 - - 148
CUT USA Kevin Na 6 - 79 69 - - 148
CUT USA Peter Uihlein 6 - 74 74 - - 148
CUT ENG Ross Fisher 6 - 75 73 - - 148
CUT AUS Scott Hend 6 - 72 76 - - 148
CUT FRA Alexander Levy 7 - 75 74 - - 149
CUT USA Bubba Watson 7 - 77 72 - - 149
CUT USA Daniel Berger 7 - 73 76 - - 149
CUT NIR Graeme McDowell 7 - 73 76 - - 149
CUT USA Hudson Swafford 7 - 77 72 - - 149
CUT NED Joost Luiten 7 - 76 73 - - 149
CUT ENG Luke Donald 7 - 76 73 - - 149
CUT USA Luke List 7 - 75 74 - - 149
CUT SCO Martin Laird 7 - 77 72 - - 149
CUT ESP Rafael Cabrera Bello 7 - 74 75 - - 149
CUT ENG Tyrrell Hatton 7 - 77 72 - - 149
CUT USA Brendan Steele 8 - 74 76 - - 150
CUT RSA Ernie Els 8 - 80 70 - - 150
CUT VEN Jhonattan Vegas 8 - 78 72 - - 150
CUT USA Jimmy Walker 8 - 81 69 - - 150
CUT CAN Mackenzie Hughes 8 - 78 72 - - 150
CUT ENG Matthew Fitzpatrick 8 - 76 74 - - 150
CUT BEL Nicolas Colsaerts 8 - 75 75 - - 150
CUT SCO Russell Knox 8 - 77 73 - - 150
CUT ESP Sergio Garcia 8 - 75 75 - - 150
CUT USA Shaun Micheel 8 - 73 77 - - 150
CUT USA William McGirt 8 - 77 73 - - 150
CUT RSA Branden Grace 9 - 77 74 - - 151
CUT SWE Jonas Blixt 9 - 74 77 - - 151
CUT ESP Pablo Larrazabal 9 - 77 74 - - 151
CUT IRL Padraig Harrington 9 - 79 72 - - 151
CUT DEN Soren Kjeldsen 9 - 73 78 - - 151
CUT JPN Yuta Ikeda 9 - 72 79 - - 151
CUT ENG Andy Sullivan 10 - 78 74 - - 152
CUT ENG Danny Willett 10 - 73 79 - - 152
CUT ARG Emiliano Grillo 10 - 78 74 - - 152
CUT USA Jim Furyk 10 - 76 76 - - 152
CUT USA Kyle Stanley 10 - 76 76 - - 152
CUT USA Wesley Bryan 10 - 74 78 - - 152
CUT USA Davis Love III 11 - 78 75 - - 153
CUT PAR Fabrizio Zanotti 11 - 80 73 - - 153
CUT USA Greg Gregory 11 - 77 76 - - 153
CUT USA John Daly 11 - 74 79 - - 153
CUT USA Phil Mickelson 11 - 79 74 - - 153
CUT USA Rich Berberian Jr 11 - 79 74 - - 153
CUT THA Thongchai Jaidee 11 - 80 73 - - 153
CUT NZL Danny Lee 12 - 76 78 - - 154
CUT USA Jaysen Hansen 12 - 84 70 - - 154
CUT USA Matt Dobyns 12 - 76 78 - - 154
CUT USA Rich Beem 12 - 82 72 - - 154
CUT CAN Adam Hadwin 13 - 79 76 - - 155
CUT USA Kenny Pigman 13 - 76 79 - - 155
CUT USA Xander Schauffele 13 - 74 81 - - 155
CUT KOR Yong-Eun Yang 13 - 76 79 - - 155
CUT USA Chris Kirk 14 - 80 76 - - 156
CUT USA David McNabb 14 - 78 78 - - 156
CUT USA J. J. Wood 14 - 78 78 - - 156
CUT USA Patrick Rodgers 14 - 79 77 - - 156
CUT AUS Rod Pampling 14 - 77 79 - - 156
CUT DEN Thomas Bjorn 14 - 79 77 - - 156
CUT BEL Thomas Pieters 14 - 79 77 - - 156
CUT AUS Cameron Smith 15 - 75 82 - - 157
CUT USA Jamie Broce 15 - 79 78 - - 157
CUT USA Scott Hebert 15 - 83 74 - - 157
CUT KOR Young-Han Song 15 - 80 77 - - 157
CUT USA Adam Rainaud 17 - 81 78 - - 159
CUT USA Alex Beach 17 - 79 80 - - 159
CUT RSA Brandon Stone 17 - 79 80 - - 159
CUT ENG Chris Moody 17 - 81 78 - - 159
CUT USA Mike Small 17 - 80 79 - - 159
CUT USA Ryan Vermeer 19 - 82 79 - - 161
CUT USA Rod Perry 21 - 82 81 - - 163
CUT USA Paul Claxton 23 - 82 83 - - 165
CUT AUS Stuart Deane 23 - 84 81 - - 165
CUT USA David Muttitt 25 - 84 83 - - 167
RET ENG Andrew Johnston Par - 78 - - - 78
RET USA Brian Smock Par - 77 - - - 77
RET KOR Si-Woo Kim Par - 79 - - - 79

 





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