Hideki Matsuyama withdraws with wrist injury

Home > News > Hideki Matsuyama withdraws with wrist injury
February 02, 2018
Posted on
May 8, 2018
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The Editorial Team in
Estimated reading time: 1 minutes

February 02, 2018

Hideki Matsuyama withdrew from the Waste Management Phoenix Open before his second-round tee time Friday because of a left wrist injury, ending his bid to match Arnold Palmer's record of three straight victories in the event.

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Matsuyama opened with a 2-under 69 on Thursday at TPC Scottsdale. The 25-year-old Japanese star has five PGA Tour victories, also winning the World Golf Championships' HSBC Champions and Bridgestone Invitational last year. He tied for 12th last week at Torrey Pines in San Diego.

Matsuyama won the last two years on the fourth hole of playoffs, beating Rickie Fowler in 2016 and Webb Simpson in 2017. Palmer won the Phoenix Open three times in a row from 1961-63.

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