The World Cup – Match history & records

<div class="article"><p><font size="+1">The World Cup - Match history &amp; records</font></p><p><img src="https://golftoday.co.uk/content/uploads/2018/01/world_cup_logo-66.gif" alt="The World Cup" width="66" height="66" border="0" align="left" hspace="3">Founded by Canadian industrialist John Jay Hopkins, in the hope of promoting goodwill between nations through golf, the World Cup began life in 1953 as the Canada Cup.</p><p>It officially became the World Cup in 1967 and, with minor changes, has been ever since. It is sanctioned by the International Federation of PGA Tours. </p><p>From 2010 onwards, the event became biennial, played in odd-numbered years, to avoid a clash with the re-introduction of golf at the Olympic Games in 2016. </p><p>From 1953 to 1999 an individual winner was also recognised with the award of the International Trophy, but since 2000 the event has been played in a foursome and fourball format.</p><p><strong>Most Team victories:</strong><br> 24 - United States<br> 5 -South Africa<br> 4 - Australia; Spain <br> 3 - Canada<br> 2 - England; Germany; Ireland; Japan; Sweden; Wales</p><p><strong>Most successive victories:</strong><br> 5 - USA (1960-64)<br> 4 - USA (1992-95)<br> 2 - Spain (1976-77); USA (1955-56, 1966-67, 1978-79) </p><p><strong>Most successful pairings:</strong><br> 4 - Jack Nicklaus &amp; Arnold Palmer (USA, 1963, 1964, 1966, 1967); Fred Couples &amp; Davis Love III (USA, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995) <br> 2 - Kel Nagle &amp; Peter Thomson (Australia, 1954, 1959)</p><p><strong>Most Team member victories:</strong><br> 6 - Jack Nicklaus (USA); Arnold Palmer (USA) <br> 4 - Fred Couples (USA); Davis Love III (USA); Sam Snead (USA)</p><p><strong>Winning team of brothers:</strong><br> 2009 - Edorado and Francesco Molinari (Italy) </p><div class="golfing_terms"><div class="table-responsive"><table width="494" border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"> <tr> <td> <div id="xtext"> <b class="xtop"><b class="xb1"></b><b class="xb2"></b><b class="xb3"></b><b class="xb4"></b></b> <div class="xboxcontent"> <p>Note: the following scoring records apply to World Cups from 2000 onwards, when the tournament adopted its current format of two rounds of foursomes and two of fourballs. </p> </div> <b class="xbottom"><b class="xb4"></b><b class="xb3"></b><b class="xb2"></b><b class="xb1"></b></b> </div></td> </tr> </table></div></div><p><strong>Lowest Tournament score:</strong><br> 252 (36 under par) - Japan (Toshimitsu Izawa &amp; Shigeki Maruyama, 2002)</p><p><strong>Lowest fourball (better-ball) score:</strong><br> 57 (15 under par) &ndash; Argentina (Angel Cabrera &amp; Eduardo Romero, 2000); New Zealand (Frank Nobilo &amp; Greg Turner, 2000); United States (Phil Mickelson &amp; David Toms, 2002)</p><p><strong>Lowest foursome (alternate shot) score:</strong><br> 61 (10 under par) - Argentina (Angel Cabrera &amp; Ricardo Gonzalez, 2005)</p><div class="golfing_terms"><div class="table-responsive"><table width="494" border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"> <tr> <td> <div id="xtext"> <b class="xtop"><b class="xb1"></b><b class="xb2"></b><b class="xb3"></b><b class="xb4"></b></b> <div class="xboxcontent"> <p>Note: the following scoring records apply to World Cups from 1954 to 1999, when the format was 72 holes of combined stroke play scores, and also an individual winner. </p> </div> <b class="xbottom"><b class="xb4"></b><b class="xb3"></b><b class="xb2"></b><b class="xb1"></b></b> </div></td> </tr> </table></div></div><p><strong>Most Individual titles:</strong><br> 3 - Jack Nicklaus<br> 2 - Roberto de Vicenzo; Johnny Miller; Gary Player; Ian Woosnam</p><p><strong>Lowest Individual Scores:</strong><br> 263 - Tiger Woods (USA, 1999)<br> 265 - Fred Couples (USA, 1994)<br> 266 - Colin Montgomerie (Scotland, 1994) </p><p><strong>Lowest Combined scores:</strong><br> 536 - USA (Fred Couples &amp; Davis Love III, 1994)<br> 543 - USA (Fred Couples &amp; Davis Love III, 1995)<br> 545 - Australia (Bruce devlin &amp; David graham, 1970); Ireland (Padraig Harrington &amp; Paul McGinley, 1997); USA (Tiger Woods &amp; Mark O'Meara, 1999) </p><p><img src="https://golftoday.co.uk/content/uploads/2018/01/thin_green_line.gif" width="494" height="20"></p></div>